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because it's indiscriminant killing, and in the old days you throw a rock over the wall of the city and you didn't see who you killed, and that's like nuclear weapons. if they used catapults then, today would be nuclear weapons. there's various arguments in that, and people tend to say, oh, that's just religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would c
for your police force for all of philadelphia. but in reality, if you can't cover the city and you can do a lot of things, the one s.w.a.t. team can never be decisive. that is where we found ourselves the begin with a significant evolution and it began to change dramatically. >> in somalia, the task force ranger had be been there a month or two before the big battle that i wrote about. during that time, they had launched six missions. so the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets, planning and operations, sometimes very quickly. once that intelligence came together, then launching it. described what a temporal up-tempo means and how that applied in iraq? >> that's exactly right. there were eight series of these that happened a number of days apart. so you gather intel, you get it together, you make a decision. you set yourself criteria to launch when the criteria are there. but it's a pretty centralized, deliberate process. we were originally doing that, and we would have this precise thing. what we found is that we were having a very narrow slow effect. we would capture all tho
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
economy. in addition to the business, support to ordinary citizens. many towns, cities have protested against the closing of mail. the post office is an important part of the town's identity and communication center. many people do not have access to the internet. according to recent study by the pew center, one in five do not use the internet. 40% of american bills do not have broadband access. senior citizens, those with less than high school education and those in low income households are the least likely to have internet access. for the 36 years before the passage of the p8 ea, the postal service is always changing from a manual process seen operation to an automated operation. to those changes come and spend the world's best postal system. to do this by identity technologies and challenges. the postal service has been well aware of the impact of the internet in developing strategies to deal with it. from 2000 through 2006 before the passage of the p8 ea, postal service reduced approximately 100,000 people, almost 80,000 came from representation. since the passage, they have redu
towards a freer environment of the city and move from the south to the north and that is what most people did. in the process of doing that, some of it became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism was in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in the relatively freer environment they are able to really create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. those in sncc and those nclc and others. who were the people who'd -- was a king, was that nocco max? was that the death of medgar evers? >> guest: all of the above. all of them had different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5